I just took part in this online radio-style talk show on media representation of gender beyond the binary! You can listen to the entire thing on the programme page, I join the conversation at about 45 minutes in, but it’s well worth listening to the entire discussion!
gqid:

Is It a Boy or a Girl? Improving Media Coverage Beyond the Binary

Sunday, March 25 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET
Join us for a radio-style program on how the media covers non-binary and non-conforming gender and what we can do to make that coverage better.
Hosted by Avory Faucette of QueerFeminism.com and Radically Queer, and featuring guests with expertise in gender-neutral parenting, non-binary identities, and media coverage of transgender issues, we’ll be looking closely at some misunderstandings the media makes and how feminists can take action to educate and improve coverage.  We’ll consider topics including major media coverage of gender-neutral parenting and education in 2011, the media’s refusal to take supermodel Andrej Pejic’s stated identity seriously, and what articles on genderqueer and other identities get right and wrong.  We’ll also be talking about the best way to cover less familiar gender identities, how journalists can describe gender in a way that is less harmful to non-binary or questioning individuals, and how blogs and social media are changing the conversation.
Guests will be:


Arwyn Daemyir, creator of Raising My Boychick;

Marilyn Roxie, creator of Genderqueer Identities and intern at the Center for Sex & Culture;

Gunner Scott, Director of the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition;

Nat Titman, creator of Practical Androgyny and the Nonbinary.org wiki


To tune in, join us from your computer at 10 am EST on Sunday, March 25.  A live stream of the show will appear when we start.  You’ll be able to ask questions or chat about the show in the chat room on that page or call in with a question using the guest call-in number listed there.  We hope you’ll join the conversation!
This event is part of WAM! It Yourself 2012, a multi-city event by Women, Action & the Media. For more information about events happening all over the world, check here or email Lexi.

Listen to WAM!-It-Yourself: Is It A Boy Or A Girl? Improving Media Coverage Beyond The Binary

I just took part in this online radio-style talk show on media representation of gender beyond the binary! You can listen to the entire thing on the programme page, I join the conversation at about 45 minutes in, but it’s well worth listening to the entire discussion!

gqid:

Is It a Boy or a Girl? Improving Media Coverage Beyond the Binary


Sunday, March 25 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Join us for a radio-style program on how the media covers non-binary and non-conforming gender and what we can do to make that coverage better.

Hosted by Avory Faucette of QueerFeminism.com and Radically Queer, and featuring guests with expertise in gender-neutral parenting, non-binary identities, and media coverage of transgender issues, we’ll be looking closely at some misunderstandings the media makes and how feminists can take action to educate and improve coverage.  We’ll consider topics including major media coverage of gender-neutral parenting and education in 2011, the media’s refusal to take supermodel Andrej Pejic’s stated identity seriously, and what articles on genderqueer and other identities get right and wrong.  We’ll also be talking about the best way to cover less familiar gender identities, how journalists can describe gender in a way that is less harmful to non-binary or questioning individuals, and how blogs and social media are changing the conversation.

Guests will be:

Arwyn Daemyir, creator of Raising My Boychick;
Marilyn Roxie, creator of Genderqueer Identities and intern at the Center for Sex & Culture;
Gunner Scott, Director of the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition;
Nat Titman, creator of Practical Androgyny and the Nonbinary.org wiki

To tune in, join us from your computer at 10 am EST on Sunday, March 25.  A live stream of the show will appear when we start.  You’ll be able to ask questions or chat about the show in the chat room on that page or call in with a question using the guest call-in number listed there.  We hope you’ll join the conversation!

This event is part of WAM! It Yourself 2012, a multi-city event by Women, Action & the Media. For more information about events happening all over the world, check here or email Lexi.

Listen to WAM!-It-Yourself: Is It A Boy Or A Girl? Improving Media Coverage Beyond The Binary

#1: The One With The Stabby Scissors

I made a podcast! (It’s supposed to be humorously inept, or at least that’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it)

weaklingscum:

Weakling Scum #1: The One With The Stabby Scissors

Remembering ‘The Edge Of Destruction’

Without any preparation, research or re-watching of the episodes, Nat attempts to summarise the plot of the classic Doctor Who serial ‘The Edge of Destruction’, randomly selected by Steven and Josh.

Download episode

I’ve set up a new deviantART profile under my usual quarridors handle and moved over the wildlife art and Doctor Who fan art digital paintings I’m happiest with.

It’s good to have all my different accounts under the same handle now!

View my new deviantART gallery

Tags: art my work

My video responses for #TransCamp:

practicalandrogyny:

Today is UK trans* activist organisation Trans Media Action’s Trans Camp event, bringing media and IT professionals together with trans* people to make positive change.

As part of the preparations, trans* people from across the UK were asked to give one minute video responses on the topics of childhood, media, comedy and family.

This is my response to the question of media representation. As a nonbinary person I felt erased or misrepresented by recent media coverage…

I’m nonbinary, that means I live as something other than a woman or a man. It also means I have next to no representation in the media.

Even in documentaries featuring trans* people with genderqueer or gender binary challenging identities or histories, like some of the participants in My Transsexual Summer, these are simplified, glossed over or completely edited out in fear of ‘confusing’ the general public.

If my life experiences are ever touched upon, they’re simplified to the point of misrepresentation. If I’m to be hinted at, it’s in the suggestion that some people are ‘in between’.

My gender and my body are not ‘between’ anything. My gender is not a balancing act. I’m not in the middle ground, I haven’t gone halfway and stopped. I am not half a woman and half a man, I’m not following two sets of sexist stereotypes. I do not ‘pick and choose’ about gender. And I’m not ‘on the fence’. And I’ve definitely not ‘de-transitioned’.

I’m a trans* person, I’m doing what I need to do to be true to myself.

Of course not all nonbinary people object to being described as ‘in between’; that’s an accurate description of some people’s gender identities. But there are many more people besides me whose experiences of being agender, bigender, fluid gender, genderqueer etc are erased by that simplification.

In my case, I experienced gender dysphoria and I did what it was necessary to do to become comfortable with my body. Doing so didn’t fix my social dysphoria though. I tried to be a ‘classic transsexual’, I tried to pretend to be a gender I didn’t truly feel I was. But I found ‘passing’ made me just as socially dysphoric as my assigned gender role had done.

It turned out that transition just wasn’t the perfect ‘package deal’ I’d been sold in the brochure, I had to go off the beaten track to find my own way to authentically express myself to the world.

It would be nice to see this represented in the media at all, especially on TV shows where some of the participants have similar feelings.

(And no, ‘androgyny’ and ‘androgyne’ don’t have to mean ‘in between’; the dictionary definition boils down to ‘having both male and female traits’, and anyway that’s my appearance not my gender).

See further one minute video responses on childhood, comedy and family from an androgynous nonbinary trans* person

Tags: my work video

As requested by my Twitter followers, here’s a recording of me singing Not While I’m Around from Sweeny Todd. It’s too fast (and gets faster as it goes!) and my voice is cracking at the high bit in the middle, but I had a lot of fun singing this :)

I made this video! Even if you’re not interested in the vocal techniques, you might find it amusing to hear me do silly voices and sing in lots of different styles :)

practicalandrogyny:

Practical Androgyny - Vocal androgyny in speech and singing

Recorded for PracticalAndrogyny.com an ambiguous gender presentation resources website.

Nat talks about how to develop a more androgynous, ambiguous or gender neutral speaking and singing voice. Assumes nothing about how you identify or whether you voice has been affected by testosterone.

Accompanying blog post with video summary, links to all singers and songs featured, bonus material, additional recommended singers and links to external resources available at:

http://practicalandrogyny.com/2011/10/31/vocal-androgyny-in-speech-and-singing/

I wrote this article but, as always, if I post it directly in my personal Tumblr then I can’t reblog it from any of the Tumblrs tied to my account…

practicalandrogyny:

I wrote an article appraising and critiquing this year’s IoS Pink List, suggesting constructive responses and looking at how some of the eleven (binary, transitioned) trans* people included for the first time this year have inspired and represented me as a nonbinary, genderqueer, gender nonconforming, queer-identified, atypically transitioning, andrognynously presenting trans* person. Here are some extracts:

This stuff is important. I had an ‘inspiration board’ on the wall of my teenage bedroom, full of printed out song lyrics, pictures and newspaper clippings that kept me going through my last couple of years as a closeted queer teenager at a rural comprehensive school (1996 to 98). My board included people like teenage Age Of Consent campaigners Chris Morris (who was the same age as me) and Euan Sutherland, and famous performers like Ellen DegeneresWilson CruzBrian MolkoDavid McAlmontAni DiFrancoMichael Stipe and Skin from Skunk Anansie. Being surrounded by images of successful queer and gender nonconforming people and listening to their music made me feel like less of a freak and gave me hope for the future.

As a community, we need visible inspirational ‘heroes’ to look up to. Some people survive, get through it and are inspired to succeed and perhaps become activists themselves due to newspaper articles just like this one. It is possible to critique the form of an award and the nature of the organisation that issued it while still seeing it as important and valuable. As little as I believe in the honours system and the monarchy, I still found it incredibly significant and inspiring when the establishment recognised the work of trans* activist Christine Burns by issuing her with an MBE in 2004 and Stephen Whittle by issuing him with an OBE in 2005.

I see these lists and the tendency to single out certain prominent famous and notable people for recognition and awards as only problematic in isolation. If we let this be the only way that trans*, queer and LGBT people are celebrated in our communities, then yes, it is problematic. If we let this start a conversation about who else should be recognised and celebrated, the hard work that so many others do in our communities and all the different ways people make a difference, then it becomes just one of many ways that the deserving, inspiring people in our communities receive thanks.

When Dan Savage started the It Gets Better campaign, I was among the critics who found it deeply problematic. But it started a conversation that prompted complementary and constructive campaigns that focused on helping young people to Make It Better, and inspired many other It Gets Better videos that weren’t problematic in the ways that Savage’s had been. There are now some amazing trans* and queer It Gets Better videos out there and no end of testimonials from people saying how seeing them has helped them in the way my inspiration board helped me.

And let’s not forget that we do have eleven openly trans* people and several more trans* allies recognised within the Pink List article. Forget the numbering and the different categories and focus on the recognition these people have been rightfully given. As I said above, I want to see more trans* people included, more trans men, more trans* people assigned female at birth, more nonbinary, openly genderqueer and solely gender nonconforming people, and I want us to work towards getting those people into next year’s list and given recognition through our own community efforts, independent of The Independent. But let’s not play down the hugely important work those who are listed have done to represent, inspire and improve the lives of all trans* people.

Travel writer Jan Morris whose groundbreaking 1974 memoir Conundrum and its journey through her transition (most notably chapter 12) was my first exposure to the reality that it was possible for me to become androgynous, it wasn’t just something that some people were naturally gifted with that I could never achieve. I cannot overstate how important this was to me and how much hope and inspiration it gave me as a dysphoric nonbinary person trying to find comfort with my body and social role.

Sarah Brown, Britain’s only openly transgender activist serving in an elected political position; a Liberal Democrat Cambridge City Councillor, and chair of the Lib Dem Transgender Working Group. Sarah was instrumental (along with Zoe O’Connell) in influencing Lib Dem MP Julian Huppert to raise the issue of gender neutral documentation such as passports in the House of Commons. Something that will be vitally important to many nonbinary, genderqueer, transgender and gender nonconforming people in this country (including myself).

Jay Stewart of Gendered Intelligence, an organisation that does hugely important creative work with young transgender and genderqueer people and is explicitly inclusive of the wider transgender spectrum. Jay organised the wonderfully positive and inclusive Trans Community Conference, that I was lucky enough to attend this year, and was previously the chair of FTM London, an AFAB (assigned female at birth) trans* support and social group known for being inclusive of all identities and expressions within the wider transgender spectrum. I have briefly spoken with Jay and seen him speak from stage and on video. He comes across as someone who comfortably challenges stereotypical assumptions that all trans men are hyper-masculine. Read him here encouraging readers of the Times Educational Supplement to celebrate transgender students and allow male assigned students to express femininity in their schools.

Journalist Juliet Jacques (in the ‘Nice to meet you’ section) whose blogging for The Guardian has talked frankly about the process of coming to terms with being a trans woman and undergoing transition in a very public and visible way that has exposed the human story behind trans* people’s lives to a whole new audience. In her earlier articles, Juliet talks about how she did not have the stereotypical transsexual childhood story (in a way I hugely identified with), and tried on and explored numerous transgender identities and communities before transitioning. She writes about having been drawn to male crossdressers, made to feel less alone by the comedy of ‘action transvestite’ Eddy Izzard and going through years of identifying as a gay male crossdresser and later ‘transgender’ as described by Leslie Feinberg and Kate Bornstein. As such she is one of the few journalists to have written about transgender people who ‘live beyond the traditional gender binary’ in a mainstream outlet.

So while I am not aware of any nonbinary, genderqueer-identified or solely gender nonconforming trans* people recognised on the Pink List this year, every one of the trans* people listed above has either worked for their rights and/or recognition in some way, or challenged binary gender roles and the public’s stereotypical view of transgender people through their openness, their humour or their own gender nonconformity. I don’t know about you but, as a genderqueer and nonbinary person, I think that’s worth celebrating.

Read the entire article at PracticalAndrogyny.com

This Keep Calm poster I made in May last year seems oddly apt today…
quarridors:

Keep Calm and Clean Up
(created using Gimp, the Keep Calm-o-matic and a photo copyright Jessica Mallock)

This Keep Calm poster I made in May last year seems oddly apt today…

quarridors:

Keep Calm and Clean Up

(created using Gimp, the Keep Calm-o-matic and a photo copyright Jessica Mallock)

I recorded this mostly lag and stutter-free flypast of the two Camp Hardknock Summer 2011 sims as viewed at Ultra settings!

This is the first video I recorded in Second Life, I’m pretty pleased by how it turned out :)

I wrote this:

practicalandrogyny:

From my personal blog:

So I’ve recently been focusing on finding the right type of activism. I’m back on focusing on visibility. I might have been a poor poster child for asexuality but for non-binary gender, a visibly androgynous person who refuses to make concessions to the binary, while getting on with their life without apology, that’s a pretty good example. That’s a case study for the people who refuse to accomodate non-binary people because “everyone sees them as men or women anyway”. That’s an example of what’s possible for questioning non-binary people who can’t feel any hope that what they know they have to be is even possible.

I’m also focusing on practicalities, on presentation, expression and behaviour. Historically the non-binary gender community has tended to focus on identity, on carving out ever more specific identity divisions and celebrating the diversity of our differences. But in our day to day lives, those of us who present ambiguity have more in common than we do different. If we’re presenting ourselves to the world as something other than female and male, women and men, it doesn’t make much of a difference if that’s because we see ourselves in terms of a gender continuum, as non-gender or as something else entirely. We deal with the same reactions from others, we have the same difficulties with gendered spaces, with forms and language, with mandatory gendering.

That’s why I started Practical Androgyny, and that’s why I’m excited to see other people taking the same focus on practical day to day living for those of us who present our non-binary genders to the world. This is the right path for me, this is activism I can believe in. And I hope it’s one that will become a movement, that has its own visibility campaigns and activist weekends. If you want to get involved, please get in touch!

I’m currently working on getting the getting resources in place on PracticalAndrogyny.com, I’m aiming to do a ‘shallow pass’ through all the resources pages and make sure there’s something written for each, with links to articles by other people on the subjects.

I’ve been looking at the questions people have been typing into Google to find the site and I want to make sure there are clear answers to all of those questions, even if it’s just a word of hope and a link to other places to look.

Tags: my work

practicalandrogyny:

Vocal Androgyny: Speaking Voice
leotron recently posted an analysis of Chris Colfer (Kurt from Glee)’s voice that included a link to this pitch chart from transgendervoice.net and the Praat voice analyzing software that can analyse the pitch range and average pitch from a voice recording.
Using these, I put a sample of my speaking voice through the system and came out with the following result:

Object type: Pitch
Object name: nat_speaking_sample
Date: Sat May  7 20:01:39 2011
Time domain:
   Start time: 0 seconds
   End time: 22.221496598639455 seconds
   Total duration: 22.221496598639455 seconds
Time sampling:
   Number of frames: 2219 (1017 voiced)
   Time step: 0.01 seconds
   First frame centred at: 0.020748299319726656 seconds
Ceiling at: 350 Hertz
Estimated quantiles:
   10% = 132.420083 Hz = 118.649931 Mel = 4.86146326 semitones above 100 Hz = 3.83294172 ERB
   16% = 141.402679 Hz = 125.842268 Mel = 5.99771342 semitones above 100 Hz = 4.04968617 ERB
   50% = 178.23178 Hz = 154.385604 Mel = 10.0050552 semitones above 100 Hz = 4.89431551 ERB
   84% = 219.087299 Hz = 184.407415 Mel = 13.5780702 semitones above 100 Hz = 5.75778106 ERB
   90% = 231.178886 Hz = 192.987241 Mel = 14.5081157 semitones above 100 Hz = 6.00018187 ERB
Estimated spreading:
   84%-median = 40.88 Hz = 30.04 Mel = 3.575 semitones = 0.8639 ERB
   median-16% = 36.85 Hz = 28.56 Mel = 4.009 semitones = 0.845 ERB
   90%-10% = 98.81 Hz = 74.37 Mel = 9.651 semitones = 2.168 ERB
Minimum 112.244444 Hz = 102.144053 Mel = 1.99972847 semitones above 100 Hz = 3.32920337 ERB
Maximum 274.863663 Hz = 222.91491 Mel = 17.5045943 semitones above 100 Hz = 6.83154756 ERB
Range 162.6 Hz = 120.770857 Mel = 15.5 semitones = 3.502 ERB
Average: 181.474855 Hz = 156.157559 Mel = 9.96947309 semitones above 100 Hz = 4.93562379 ERB
Standard deviation: 36.31 Hz = 27.15 Mel = 3.485 semitones = 0.7894 ERB
Mean absolute slope: 235.1 Hz/s = 176.8 Mel/s = 23.03 semitones/s = 5.153 ERB/s
Mean absolute slope without octave jumps: 22.14 semitones/s

Which if I’m reading correctly against the pitch chart, means my average speaking pitch is 181.5Hz - firmly within ‘gender ambiguous’ range. The minimum is 112.2Hz - firmly within ‘masculine’, and the maximum is 274.8Hz - firmly within ‘feminine’.
Of course that’s only in terms of vocal pitch and doesn’t take speech patterns, cadence and intonation into account, but it explains why I can still successfully ‘pass’ as gender ambiguous/confusing even when speaking (and why when I’m read as a guy, I’m often assumed to be a teenager rather than an adult).
Thought you guys might find this interesting, there’s a full Practical Androgyny post about vocal androgyny planned for the near future!
Incidentally, the speech therapist who created the pitch chart also has a page on speech training for genderqueer people which may be of interest.

Pitch analysis of the voice sample I just posted.

practicalandrogyny:

Vocal Androgyny: Speaking Voice

leotron recently posted an analysis of Chris Colfer (Kurt from Glee)’s voice that included a link to this pitch chart from transgendervoice.net and the Praat voice analyzing software that can analyse the pitch range and average pitch from a voice recording.

Using these, I put a sample of my speaking voice through the system and came out with the following result:

Object type: Pitch

Object name: nat_speaking_sample

Date: Sat May  7 20:01:39 2011

Time domain:

   Start time: 0 seconds

   End time: 22.221496598639455 seconds

   Total duration: 22.221496598639455 seconds

Time sampling:

   Number of frames: 2219 (1017 voiced)

   Time step: 0.01 seconds

   First frame centred at: 0.020748299319726656 seconds

Ceiling at: 350 Hertz

Estimated quantiles:

   10% = 132.420083 Hz = 118.649931 Mel = 4.86146326 semitones above 100 Hz = 3.83294172 ERB

   16% = 141.402679 Hz = 125.842268 Mel = 5.99771342 semitones above 100 Hz = 4.04968617 ERB

   50% = 178.23178 Hz = 154.385604 Mel = 10.0050552 semitones above 100 Hz = 4.89431551 ERB

   84% = 219.087299 Hz = 184.407415 Mel = 13.5780702 semitones above 100 Hz = 5.75778106 ERB

   90% = 231.178886 Hz = 192.987241 Mel = 14.5081157 semitones above 100 Hz = 6.00018187 ERB

Estimated spreading:

   84%-median = 40.88 Hz = 30.04 Mel = 3.575 semitones = 0.8639 ERB

   median-16% = 36.85 Hz = 28.56 Mel = 4.009 semitones = 0.845 ERB

   90%-10% = 98.81 Hz = 74.37 Mel = 9.651 semitones = 2.168 ERB

Minimum 112.244444 Hz = 102.144053 Mel = 1.99972847 semitones above 100 Hz = 3.32920337 ERB

Maximum 274.863663 Hz = 222.91491 Mel = 17.5045943 semitones above 100 Hz = 6.83154756 ERB

Range 162.6 Hz = 120.770857 Mel = 15.5 semitones = 3.502 ERB

Average: 181.474855 Hz = 156.157559 Mel = 9.96947309 semitones above 100 Hz = 4.93562379 ERB

Standard deviation: 36.31 Hz = 27.15 Mel = 3.485 semitones = 0.7894 ERB

Mean absolute slope: 235.1 Hz/s = 176.8 Mel/s = 23.03 semitones/s = 5.153 ERB/s

Mean absolute slope without octave jumps: 22.14 semitones/s

Which if I’m reading correctly against the pitch chart, means my average speaking pitch is 181.5Hz - firmly within ‘gender ambiguous’ range. The minimum is 112.2Hz - firmly within ‘masculine’, and the maximum is 274.8Hz - firmly within ‘feminine’.

Of course that’s only in terms of vocal pitch and doesn’t take speech patterns, cadence and intonation into account, but it explains why I can still successfully ‘pass’ as gender ambiguous/confusing even when speaking (and why when I’m read as a guy, I’m often assumed to be a teenager rather than an adult).

Thought you guys might find this interesting, there’s a full Practical Androgyny post about vocal androgyny planned for the near future!

Incidentally, the speech therapist who created the pitch chart also has a page on speech training for genderqueer people which may be of interest.

Pitch analysis of the voice sample I just posted.

Practical Androgyny is a new website I’ve just launched devoted to the practicalities of ambiguous gender presentation within a binary gendered society. To accompany the site, I’ve also created a new tumblog, http://practicalandrogyny.tumblr.com/ and yes, that’s a picture of me :)
practicalandrogyny:


Hi, I’m Nat and I’m an androgyne, by which I mean that when you meet me my ‘sex’ is confusing or not immediately apparent. I tend to get a mix of different gender perceptions from others because my gender presentation is ambiguous. Personally, I’m happy with that because I have a non-binary gender identity. By which I mean that I am something other than the binary genders of female and male, man and woman. I prefer there to be some confusion or ambiguity in my appearance so people have to think about who I am rather than jump to an easy but incorrect answer of female or male.
I’m currently in my early 30s and I’ve felt uncomfortable with my assigned gender since I was eleven. I started identifying with androgyny in my mid teens after discovering the Androgyny RAQ and other websites of that period, but despite telling friends about my feelings, I became increasingly gender dysphoric until I concluded that I must be transsexual. I transitioned in the late 1990s and felt considerably more comfortable with my body as a result, however I still felt gender dysphoria from my social interactions with others. I felt that both binary gender roles were wrong for me and that I needed to step away from them and simply be myself. After a couple of years exploring my feelings in the early Internet genderqueer community, I re-transitioned to live as an androgyne. As of this summer, I’ll have been presenting androgynously for ten years.
My actual gender identity is something considerably more complicated and personal than ‘androgyne’. You could say that I’m ‘non-gendered’ or ‘third gendered’ or ‘somewhere in the middle’, I personally think gender is more complicated than all those imply. I’m most likely to sit you down and have a long conversation about my gender, or give you the short Facebook-esque response of “It’s complicated”. Either way, ‘androgyne’ isn’t how I identify, it’s just the simplest way of explaining what I am. I am apractical androgyne.

Read more about my experiences at PracticalAndrogyny.com

Practical Androgyny is a new website I’ve just launched devoted to the practicalities of ambiguous gender presentation within a binary gendered society. To accompany the site, I’ve also created a new tumblog, http://practicalandrogyny.tumblr.com/ and yes, that’s a picture of me :)

practicalandrogyny:

Hi, I’m Nat and I’m an androgyne, by which I mean that when you meet me my ‘sex’ is confusing or not immediately apparent. I tend to get a mix of different gender perceptions from others because my gender presentation is ambiguous. Personally, I’m happy with that because I have a non-binary gender identity. By which I mean that I am something other than the binary genders of female and male, man and woman. I prefer there to be some confusion or ambiguity in my appearance so people have to think about who I am rather than jump to an easy but incorrect answer of female or male.

I’m currently in my early 30s and I’ve felt uncomfortable with my assigned gender since I was eleven. I started identifying with androgyny in my mid teens after discovering the Androgyny RAQ and other websites of that period, but despite telling friends about my feelings, I became increasingly gender dysphoric until I concluded that I must be transsexual. I transitioned in the late 1990s and felt considerably more comfortable with my body as a result, however I still felt gender dysphoria from my social interactions with others. I felt that both binary gender roles were wrong for me and that I needed to step away from them and simply be myself. After a couple of years exploring my feelings in the early Internet genderqueer community, I re-transitioned to live as an androgyne. As of this summer, I’ll have been presenting androgynously for ten years.

My actual gender identity is something considerably more complicated and personal than ‘androgyne’. You could say that I’m ‘non-gendered’ or ‘third gendered’ or ‘somewhere in the middle’, I personally think gender is more complicated than all those imply. I’m most likely to sit you down and have a long conversation about my gender, or give you the short Facebook-esque response of “It’s complicated”. Either way, ‘androgyne’ isn’t how I identify, it’s just the simplest way of explaining what I am. I am apractical androgyne.

Read more about my experiences at PracticalAndrogyny.com

Tags: my work gender

Today’s sketch: The Eleventh Doctor

Today’s sketch: The Eleventh Doctor

Radio Free Skaro: More awesome than… [High res version here]
(Happy 200th Episode RFS!)

Radio Free Skaro: More awesome than… [High res version here]

(Happy 200th Episode RFS!)