youneedacat:

realsocialskills:

Ugh, speaking as someone with an Asperger’s diagnosis, I HATED Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime. I literally threw the book at the wall in fury halfway through, that’s how much its…

My problem with Curious Incident, extra to what youneedacat raises is that it was intended to be a dark comedy, at the expense of the autistic protagonist. Who was made up as a set of logical rules rather than as a realistic representation of a person.

Here’s a couple of examples of Mark Haddon saying this:

Interview 1:

"Mark Haddon: The voice happened by accident. I started with the image of the dead dog, then realised that (in my own slightly twisted opinion) it sounded funny if it was described in a very deadpan, factual manner. Only then did I start to wonder who that deadpan, factual voice might belong to.”

Interview 2:

Dave: Where did you find the original impulse to write this novel? I know that it wasn’t a matter of you thinking you’d write a book about an autistic boy, as some might presume. 

"Mark Haddon: No, very deliberately not. And I think if I had done that I’d have run the risk of producing a very stolid, earnest, and over‐worthy book. It came from the image of the dead dog with the fork through it. I just wanted a good image on that first page. To me, that was gripping and vivid, and it stuck in your head. Only when I was writing it did I realize, at least to my mind, that it was also quite funny. But it was only funny if you described it in the voice that I used in the book. So the dog came along first, then the voice. Only after a few pages did I really start to ask, Who does the voice belong to? So Christopher came along, in fact, after the book had already got underway.”


I’ve been and seen the stage version of Curious Incident performed and the audience laughs at the things Christopher says and does pretty consistently throughout the play, except for when it’s being tragic and scary. The biggest laughs are when he’s talking to strangers who don’t know he’s autistic. 

Most of the reviews I’ve seen have classed both the book and play as a comedy too, usually qualified as ‘bitter’, ‘dark’, ‘challenging’ as well. No one’s laughing with the character, it’s all at him, even when they’re being sympathetic towards him at other times and that makes me very uncomfortable.

(Source: realsocialskills, via realsocialskills)

enerjax:

Reminder to check all bonfires for Johns before lighting.

We were all thinking this during last night’s episode, right? :)

enerjax:

Reminder to check all bonfires for Johns before lighting.

We were all thinking this during last night’s episode, right? :)

I wrote a thing for Autistic Pride Day about why I’m openly autistic:

Pride is the opposite of shame, and that’s what pride events are about; not being ashamed of who we are. Autism is pervasive, it affects how we perceive, think about and interact with the world, and so it’s an inseparable part of who we are as autistic people. There are a lot of negative things written and said about autism so it’s important for us to push back and say that we like being who we are despite of all the challenges.

I’ve already written here about how there are positives to being autistic but I also want to say a little more about why I chose to be open about my diagnosis rather than keep it as something personal that I only shared with family, close friends, and employers or other professionals on a need to know basis.

Read the rest of the article at Graphic Explanations

A photograph (description below) of my interaction badge from the UK autistic run conference/retreat Autscape last year. Autscape is kind of the European version of Autreat and will be happening again in Yorkshire this August.
I found that interaction badges make a huge difference with autistic access. People take them seriously and you can use them to have no one initiate interaction with you, or only people you’d told in advance can do so. I found them helpful the one time I was overloaded and couldn’t deal with people, and also found the green badges helpful for knowing I had permission to talk to people.
The orange star is to give people permission to *ask* if they may touch you, for example for people who like to be hugged and would like people to ask for permission to hug them. Without this star no one should even ask to touch you, let alone hug.
I really enjoyed my experience at Autscape and I’ve already registered to go back this year. I especially enjoyed the sensory room and the ‘sparklies in the dark’ group stimming outside after dark. It was wonderful to be in clearly autistic space where stimming and being explicit and direct were the norm and celebrated. I’m looking forwards to going again this year :)
[Image description: A plastic name badge and transparent card holder decorated with stickers, both attached to a lanyard. The name badge reads ‘Nat’ in large letters, above this in smaller letters is ‘Autscape - an autistic conference’. Inside the card holder is a green piece of paper printed with text reading, in increasingly smaller text, ‘Green / Please Initiate / I would like to socialise, but I have difficulty initiating. Please Initiate with me.’ Around the card holder are similar white, red and yellow papers reading ‘White / Neutral / I am able to regulate my own interactions.’, ‘Red / No Initiation’ and ‘Yellow / Prior Permission / Please do not initiate unless I have already given you permission to approach me on a yellow badge.’ There are also two large bright orange paper 6 pointed stars.]

A photograph (description below) of my interaction badge from the UK autistic run conference/retreat Autscape last year. Autscape is kind of the European version of Autreat and will be happening again in Yorkshire this August.

I found that interaction badges make a huge difference with autistic access. People take them seriously and you can use them to have no one initiate interaction with you, or only people you’d told in advance can do so. I found them helpful the one time I was overloaded and couldn’t deal with people, and also found the green badges helpful for knowing I had permission to talk to people.

The orange star is to give people permission to *ask* if they may touch you, for example for people who like to be hugged and would like people to ask for permission to hug them. Without this star no one should even ask to touch you, let alone hug.

I really enjoyed my experience at Autscape and I’ve already registered to go back this year. I especially enjoyed the sensory room and the ‘sparklies in the dark’ group stimming outside after dark. It was wonderful to be in clearly autistic space where stimming and being explicit and direct were the norm and celebrated. I’m looking forwards to going again this year :)

[Image description: A plastic name badge and transparent card holder decorated with stickers, both attached to a lanyard. The name badge reads ‘Nat’ in large letters, above this in smaller letters is ‘Autscape - an autistic conference’. Inside the card holder is a green piece of paper printed with text reading, in increasingly smaller text, ‘Green / Please Initiate / I would like to socialise, but I have difficulty initiating. Please Initiate with me.’ Around the card holder are similar white, red and yellow papers reading ‘White / Neutral / I am able to regulate my own interactions.’, ‘Red / No Initiation’ and ‘Yellow / Prior Permission / Please do not initiate unless I have already given you permission to approach me on a yellow badge.’ There are also two large bright orange paper 6 pointed stars.]

par-la-fenetre:

Number one public stim (not as obviously as pictured though)! I cross my toes too but come on I have a hard enough time drawing fingers already.  (⌒_⌒;)
Thanks you all for your help and Nat from Quarridors for this idea!
Serie: The ABC of Stimming

Yay! That’s one of my common stims too :)

par-la-fenetre:

Number one public stim (not as obviously as pictured though)! I cross my toes too but come on I have a hard enough time drawing fingers already.  (⌒_⌒;)

Thanks you all for your help and Nat from Quarridors for this idea!

Serie: The ABC of Stimming

Yay! That’s one of my common stims too :)

Looking back at my 2012, I went through some pretty major life changes and made some significant achievements, despite the year mainly feeling like putting my life on hold.

Read more at Dreamwidth…

Having written and proofread the above, 2012 feels like a year where I purposely put everything on hold, ‘reinstalled’ my identity and hopefully set myself up with a freshly formatted stable home and social life on which to build sustainable new routines, projects and relationships from a position of greater self-knowledge.

The changes I’ve already made seem to have helped with problems like low level chronic fatigue, which I take as an extremely positive sign that I’m doing the right sorts of things. Next year I’m hoping to work productively with the specialists at Nottingham City Asperger Service on helping me to understand myself and develop better strategies for maximising my strengths and working around my difficulties. I’m also planning to take some of my existing projects out of hiatus and take them in a new, more authentic intersectional direction. I’m feeling optimistic.

Hopefully 2013 will be the year I take my life out of hiatus.

The Tomorrow People to jaunt again

This Sunday is going to be the 20th anniversary of the 1990s version of The Tomorrow People.

I’ve been obsessed with the show since I saw that first serial aged 13, but it’s not a fandom I’ve shared with many other people. In my 20s I obsessively tracked down the VHS, the 1970s original series and the books associated with both, wrote fan fiction (the only series I’ve ever done this for) and ran a fan site for a year or so that gained pretty much no interest. I’ve had a few good discussions at sci-fi cons and occasionally on Twitter, but my TP fandom was always very …personal, and Doctor Who was always a much more mainstream fandom.

I was planning to spend Sunday rewatching the 1990s Origin Story and reflecting on 20 years of loving the show, but this evening I got home from the supermarket to discover that two of the co-creators and producers of Arrow and The Vampire Diaries and the writer of Chuck are getting together to remake ‘Tomorrow People’ for the American CW cable network(!!!?!?!?!).

It took me a good hour of giggling and flailing before I even managed to process the news. I haven’t reacted as pessimistically as others have. I’ve wished for another remake for years. I’m already a fan of a remake of this show, and the original, I have no problem with it being done differently again. I genuinely regularly dream that I’m watching the pilot for a new series of The Tomorrow People then wake up upset that it wasn’t real. I watched two seasons of True Blood despite not really liking it very much, just because one of the characters was a bit like a Tomorrow Person. I really will watch anything with telepathy and/or teleportation.

I don’t even have a problem with this being American; The 90’s series was an American co-production with Nickelodeon and an Australian lead, so it’s not that much of a jump for me (although I’d love an international cast - let one of those many British actors in US TV use their natural accent!). I also really like The Vampire Diaries, Arrow and Chuck and actually feel like the show might be in good hands. People who grew up watching the 90s version (on Nickelodeon or ITV) could be TV executives in their 30s now, so this show could have been pursued for remake by genuine fans! I don’t even mind this being on the CW which tends to go for the teen romance angle - both the 70s and 90s versions of the show had prominent ‘teen heart throb’ stars after all. So unless they utterly miss the point or manage to make it completely terrible, or it doesn’t even make it to pilot, there’s a good chance that I’m going to love this show!

This is REALLY not the 20th anniversary of the remake I was expecting - from now on it’s going to be ‘the first remake’!

This video utterly made my day - new Ben Folds Five AND new Fraggle Rock! :D

(Source: itswalky)

I saw the gender clinic for my surgery follow up today. That’s going to be the last time I should ever need to see them!

After getting blocked by Canterbury PCT in 2002 and having started out in 1999, it feels good to have finally successfully got everything I needed out of the system. I was extremely nervous and felt very vulnerable when I submitted myself to Nottingham Gender Clinic as nonbinary in 2009, but my psych was friendly and cooperative, understanding and helpful right up to the last moment. I’m regretting not asking for a parting hug rather than a handshake! :)

It felt so good to have seen a gender psych for the last time that I celebrated with ice cream :D

From the archives of the New Yorker, Art Spiegelman’s comic strip tribute to Maurice Sendak.

blowncovers:

We’ll miss you.

(via its-almost-as-if)

So this video made me cry buckets. Still hopelessly romantic then…

Tags: video love

Space Stallions: This amazing bachelor film animation project combines the campest parts of all those 1980s hero team cartoons into distilled awesomeness!

Like smirking at (but secretly loving) He-Man, Thundercats, Jem and the like? WATCH THIS!

Tags: animation

I’m finding the Dapper Dinos tumblr quite unreasonably amusing!
dapperdinos:


A selection of dinosaurs showing off their dapper headgear.

a multitude of extraordinarily dapper dinosaurs! Too many to count! Well done!

I’m finding the Dapper Dinos tumblr quite unreasonably amusing!

dapperdinos:

A selection of dinosaurs showing off their dapper headgear.

a multitude of extraordinarily dapper dinosaurs! Too many to count! Well done!

Tags: humour

I just took part in this online radio-style talk show on media representation of gender beyond the binary! You can listen to the entire thing on the programme page, I join the conversation at about 45 minutes in, but it’s well worth listening to the entire discussion!
gqid:

Is It a Boy or a Girl? Improving Media Coverage Beyond the Binary

Sunday, March 25 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET
Join us for a radio-style program on how the media covers non-binary and non-conforming gender and what we can do to make that coverage better.
Hosted by Avory Faucette of QueerFeminism.com and Radically Queer, and featuring guests with expertise in gender-neutral parenting, non-binary identities, and media coverage of transgender issues, we’ll be looking closely at some misunderstandings the media makes and how feminists can take action to educate and improve coverage.  We’ll consider topics including major media coverage of gender-neutral parenting and education in 2011, the media’s refusal to take supermodel Andrej Pejic’s stated identity seriously, and what articles on genderqueer and other identities get right and wrong.  We’ll also be talking about the best way to cover less familiar gender identities, how journalists can describe gender in a way that is less harmful to non-binary or questioning individuals, and how blogs and social media are changing the conversation.
Guests will be:


Arwyn Daemyir, creator of Raising My Boychick;

Marilyn Roxie, creator of Genderqueer Identities and intern at the Center for Sex & Culture;

Gunner Scott, Director of the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition;

Nat Titman, creator of Practical Androgyny and the Nonbinary.org wiki


To tune in, join us from your computer at 10 am EST on Sunday, March 25.  A live stream of the show will appear when we start.  You’ll be able to ask questions or chat about the show in the chat room on that page or call in with a question using the guest call-in number listed there.  We hope you’ll join the conversation!
This event is part of WAM! It Yourself 2012, a multi-city event by Women, Action & the Media. For more information about events happening all over the world, check here or email Lexi.

Listen to WAM!-It-Yourself: Is It A Boy Or A Girl? Improving Media Coverage Beyond The Binary

I just took part in this online radio-style talk show on media representation of gender beyond the binary! You can listen to the entire thing on the programme page, I join the conversation at about 45 minutes in, but it’s well worth listening to the entire discussion!

gqid:

Is It a Boy or a Girl? Improving Media Coverage Beyond the Binary


Sunday, March 25 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET

Join us for a radio-style program on how the media covers non-binary and non-conforming gender and what we can do to make that coverage better.

Hosted by Avory Faucette of QueerFeminism.com and Radically Queer, and featuring guests with expertise in gender-neutral parenting, non-binary identities, and media coverage of transgender issues, we’ll be looking closely at some misunderstandings the media makes and how feminists can take action to educate and improve coverage.  We’ll consider topics including major media coverage of gender-neutral parenting and education in 2011, the media’s refusal to take supermodel Andrej Pejic’s stated identity seriously, and what articles on genderqueer and other identities get right and wrong.  We’ll also be talking about the best way to cover less familiar gender identities, how journalists can describe gender in a way that is less harmful to non-binary or questioning individuals, and how blogs and social media are changing the conversation.

Guests will be:

Arwyn Daemyir, creator of Raising My Boychick;
Marilyn Roxie, creator of Genderqueer Identities and intern at the Center for Sex & Culture;
Gunner Scott, Director of the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition;
Nat Titman, creator of Practical Androgyny and the Nonbinary.org wiki

To tune in, join us from your computer at 10 am EST on Sunday, March 25.  A live stream of the show will appear when we start.  You’ll be able to ask questions or chat about the show in the chat room on that page or call in with a question using the guest call-in number listed there.  We hope you’ll join the conversation!

This event is part of WAM! It Yourself 2012, a multi-city event by Women, Action & the Media. For more information about events happening all over the world, check here or email Lexi.

Listen to WAM!-It-Yourself: Is It A Boy Or A Girl? Improving Media Coverage Beyond The Binary

This may actually be the greatest thing ever! - Oh and you can play me on Draw Something as ‘quarridors’ (predictably).

itswalky:

sequentialmatt:

DrawSomething: Chris Sims Batman Edition

As a challenge, I have restricted myself to drawing words as they relate to Batman when playing across Chris Sims. In the event I cannot do this, I have allowed myself only one exception, which you see at the very end of this post.

(This idea emerged out of a similar gentlemen’s agreement I had with Daniel Butler, where we limited ourselves to using ROM Spaceknight. I will post some of those soon.)

Please enjoy.

Playing this exact “have to draw Batman” game on iDraw over eight years ago is why Shortpacked! exists.  True story.

Tags: humour